Martyr – Unicorn Theatre

Teenage rebellion manifests itself in many ways: parents are primed for dealing with issues surrounding drink and drugs… but not religion. In Martyr, When Benjamin Sinclair develops an unhealthy obsession for a sacred text and starts making increasingly Puritanical demands on his mother and school, the responsible adults in his life suddenly find themselves out of their depth in the face of his self-imposed indoctrination. Originally written in German by Marius von Mayenburg, this translation by Maja Zade is presented by the Actors Touring Company (a group who use Theatre “to examine the world around us”). Martyr explores the grey area between standing up for your beliefs and dogmatic fixation, but it does feel as if it has tried to tackle too much.

On an open set comprised of various boxy levels and rooms (cleverly designed by director Ramin Gray), the cast are neatly slotted in amongst tables, chairs and benches, remaining on stage the entire time. Whilst it may look a bit jumbled and abstract, it allows quick transitions between the many short scenes and makes the most of the depth of the space in the Unicorn Theatre. Scenes are lightly underscored with the occasional bit of music, including what sounded like a very apt instrumental bit of Nirvana’s Smells Like Teen Spirit.

Daniel O’Keefe is a thoroughly obstreperous and volatile as Benjamin, his every word punctuated with malevolent bile; He visibly revels in the knowledge that the school is obliged to respect all religious beliefs, even a very medieval approach to the Bible, much to the chagrin of his teachers. Farshid Rokey plays the foil as the impressionable and gawky George Hansen: a prime example of how easily the vulnerable can be influenced by those they idolise. Their scenes together strike a perfect balance between comedy and tragedy, as George so willingly becomes a disciple without a thought for the ramifications of his actions. Jessye Romeo is effortlessly feline as their classmate Lydia, deliberately taunting Benjamin with everything he would deny himself.

Photo by Stephen Cummiskey

My ticket was courtesy of Bargain Theatre – to read the review in full, please click here.

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